Celebrating Black History Month

By FPL_AshleyA

Interested in learning more about American history? These are black stories of innovation and inspiration.

George Washington Carver (1864?-1943)
A key figure in southern agriculture and botany, Carver earned a master’s degree at Iowa State Agriculture College. His research helped sharecroppers understand how to replenish soil ravaged by years of cotton-growing.

George Washington Carver, opens a new window

Neil deGrasse Tyson (1958-
Astrophysicist and planetary scientist Neil deGrasse Tyson earned his B.A. in Physics from Harvard and a Ph.D. in Astrophysics from Columbia. He has served on two separate national commissions on Aerospace industry and U.S. Space Exploration. He is currently the fifth head of the Hayden Planetarian in New York City.

Letters From An Astrophysicist, opens a new window

Katherine Johnson (1918-2020)
Mathematician Katherine Johnson was instrumental in the successful 1962 orbital mission of astronaut John Glenn. She ran the numbers by hand on her desktop mechanical calculating machine. Her calculations helped propel the U.S. in the coveted space race during this time.

Hidden Figures, opens a new window

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968) and Malcolm X (1925-1965)
Two pivotal figures in the Civil Rights Movement had very different ideas and aspirations. How were these two different? What can be learned from their lives and history?

The Sword and the Shield, opens a new window

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895)
Famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass escaped from slavery and became known for his writings and speeches. His first-hand account of his experience provides readers with an unflinching look at the horrors of slavery.

Frederick Douglass, opens a new window

For more stories and voices honoring Black History Month, check out FPL's book lists:

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