History of Hot Chocolate

Drinking chocolate has been around for centuries. Over the years, it has transformed to reflect the different cultures around the world. The Aztec and Maya of Mesoamerica drank it cold, unsweet, and frothy. In the 1500s, the Spanish added milk to their cold, chocolatey beverage. The 1700s brought about the rise of chocolate houses (modern day coffee shops) and a sweetened hot, drink for Londoners. Some locations drink it on special occasions, while others drink it as part of breakfast. No matter where you are, you can find a hot chocolate that will fit your taste. 

Here are some of Frisco Public Library staff’s favorite hot chocolate recipes. Click to download a print version of our recipes.

Lauren’s Vegan Hot Chocolate 

Ingredients: 

  • 13.5 oz can "lite" coconut milk  
  • tbsps.  unsweetened cocoa powder 
  • 3 heaping tbsps. semi-sweet dairy-free chocolate chips 
  • 1-2 tbsps. maple syrup, depending on how sweet you like it 
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract 
  • 1/2 tsp. ground espresso or instant coffee 
  • 1/8 tsp. fine sea salt 
  • Optional: whipped cream, shaved chocolate, marshmallows, etc 

Directions: 

  1. Add all the ingredients, except the chocolate chips, to a blender or food processor and process until smooth and frothy. It will only get frothy on a high speed and after a few minutes. 
  2. Add the mixture to a pot over medium heat and then add the chocolate chips. Once it begins to bubble, whisk continuously for about 4 minutes until well heated and has thickened just a bit. You don't want to overcook it, or it will get too thick.  
  3. Remove and pour into mugs and add your topping of choice. 

Jen's Hot Chocolate Mix 

Ingredients: 

  • 1 (14 quart) box powdered milk 
  • 1 (32 oz.) can Nestle's Quick 
  • 1 (16 oz.) jar of Cremora coffee creamer (or other powdered coffee creamer) 
  • 1 (16 oz.) box powdered sugar 
  • 3 tsp cinnamon 

Directions: 

  1. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and mix well. 
  2. Put 1/3 cup hot chocolate mix in a mug and add boiling water. 

Note- this makes a lot of mix- why not share some with friends and neighbors? Perfect holiday gift! 

 

Adam’s Atole Recipe 

Ingredients: 

  • 1/2 cup of harina masa 
  • 2 1/2 cups of water 
  • 1 1/2 cups of milk 
  • 1/4 cup grated piloncillo (or brown sugar) 
  • 1 teaspoon of cinnamon  
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla  
  • 1 disk of chopped Mexican chocolate (Ibarra, Abuelita) or 1 oz of semi-sweet chocolate chips (chocolate is often optional in traditional recipes) 

Directions: 

  1. In a medium sauce pan combine masa harina, water, milk, piloncillo, and chocolate. Whisk mixture to combine. Bring it all to a simmer over medium or medium-high heat. Simmer mixture on medium for 5 minutes, whisking often. 
  2. Once your desired consistency is reached (I like mine thick), add in vanilla and whisk. 
  3. Serve hot or warm with a pinch of cinnamon on top. 

 

Yvette’s Mexican Hot Chocolate 

Ingredients: 

  • 3cups of milk 
  • 1 cinnamon stick 
  • ½ a broken tablet of Mexican chocolate 
  • 1 tbsp. Vanilla extract 

Directions: 

  1. Heat the milk, cinnamon stick, and Mexican chocolate on stove top till right before boiling. 
  2. Remove pan from heat and stir in vanilla. Beat with a whisk until foamy. 
  3. If desired add a pinch of cinnamon, nutmeg, cayenne pepper, and salt. Top with whipped cream. 

Julie’s Peppermint Hot Chocolate 

Ingredients: 

  • ¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder 
  • ½ cup granulate sugar 
  • 1/3 cup hot water 
  • 1/8 tsp. Salt 
  • 4 cups milk or non-dairy almond, soy or oat milk 
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract 
  • ½ tsp. Peppermint extract 

Directions: 

  1. Combine the cocoa, sugar, water, and salt in a medium saucepan on medium heat. Stir constantly until the mixture boils. 
  2. Cook for 1 minute, stirring constantly. 
  3. Stir in the milk but do not let it boil. 
  4. Remove from heat, then add the vanilla and peppermint extracts. Mix well. 
  5. Serve immediately and top with your favorite stir-ins. 
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