How to Create a Cozy Relaxation Space

By FPL_AshleyA

After a long day, a cozy and comfortable space can make all the difference!

Step 1–Lighting

Warm and inviting lighting creates a softer atmosphere for overworked and tired eyes. Give your eyes a break by either dimming the lights or subduing a bright lamp by draping a scarf or old T-shirt over it. Similarly, you can invest in color changing lightbulbs. A dark orange lightbulb can simulate the light from a sunset.

Step 2–A Landing Pad

A comfortable chair, a plush bed or even a pillowy blanket on the floor can invite a weary individual to relax. Wherever you choose, make sure it is well-stocked with a good mix of supportive and squishy pillows. Grab a good book to complete the experience.

Step 3–Soundscape

Do you like the sound of gentle rain? What about a crackling fire? Think about the type of sound that relaxes you most. There are many white noise apps that can help you find the perfect sound. In addition, music has been shown to reduce anxiety and improve sleep quality. Listen to your favorite music in your new cozy relaxation space.

Step 4–Aromatherapy

What smells bring you comfort and peace? Do you gravitate towards warm and spicy scents like cinnamon, clove, vanilla, or honey? Do you like fresh scents like citrus fruits, fresh laundry, or ocean air? Think about fragrances that relax you the most and seek them out in the form of candles, wax melts, or oil diffusers.

Calming sites online:

Create colorful sand art, opens a new window  

Create your perfect mix of coffee shop sounds, opens a new window 

Listen to ambient sounds of the ocean or a country garden, opens a new window  

Additional resources on relaxation:

Stress Management and Relaxation Techniques, opens a new window

Self-Care and Stress Relief Tips from the CDC, opens a new window

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